23 year old, Systems theory junkie, INTP, and Transhumanist.

 

fyeaheasterneurope:

What even is Transylvania anyway?

Well, it’s not the imaginary homeland of vampires, that’s for sure.

Transylvania is a historical region in Romania. (It’s the light yellow region in the map up there.) Its name means “on the far side of the forest”, derived from the Latin trans, meaning “beyond” and sylvanus, which means “forest”. It has a long and interesting history, having changed hands between various empires and nations over the years. These days it is primarily ethnically Romanian, with a large ethnic Hungarian minority. It’s famous for its beautiful scenery and picturesque architecture.

So why is it associated with vampires? Because it is the setting of Bram Stoker’s iconic novel Dracula. The character of Dracula was based on a real person, Vlad III, who was almost certainly not a vampire, but is a Romanian folk hero, remembered for his efforts in fighting off the Ottomans. (Okay, and also for impaling a lot of people. But he still wasn’t a vampire!)

crystilogic:

from Pensaci, Giacomino by Luigi Pirandello (1917, ed. Edoardo A. Lèbano 1971)

I found this at Myopic in Chicago. It’s a play—an edition in Italian, with great notes in English—about an old school teacher who wants to marry the custodian’s pregnant daughter so she’ll get his government pension for fifty years after he dies. It sounds creepy but the marriage is chaste (her boyfriend sleeps over) and he’s actually a good guy. There’s this whole Italian tradition of using formalities to fuck with the government.

Later on I sat on a couch in a coffee shop with this girl E. and we read the first act out loud in Italian, checking the notes every paragraph or two when we didn’t know a word or phrase. It’s such a fun language to say out loud. And all you have to do is your best silly Italian accent and pronounce all the letters and it comes out basically like you’d hear on the streets of Florence.

crystilogic:

from Pensaci, Giacomino by Luigi Pirandello (1917, ed. Edoardo A. Lèbano 1971)

I found this at Myopic in Chicago. It’s a play—an edition in Italian, with great notes in English—about an old school teacher who wants to marry the custodian’s pregnant daughter so she’ll get his government pension for fifty years after he dies. It sounds creepy but the marriage is chaste (her boyfriend sleeps over) and he’s actually a good guy. There’s this whole Italian tradition of using formalities to fuck with the government.

Later on I sat on a couch in a coffee shop with this girl E. and we read the first act out loud in Italian, checking the notes every paragraph or two when we didn’t know a word or phrase. It’s such a fun language to say out loud. And all you have to do is your best silly Italian accent and pronounce all the letters and it comes out basically like you’d hear on the streets of Florence.

Technoccult: Dune/Star Wars Parallels

technoccult:

Justine Shaw, Star Wars and Dune comparison

Probably obvious to those who have read the book and seen the movies, but interesting in light of the Skywalker Paradigm, which holds, for example, that Jabba is nobility and not a gangster (he’s referred to as “Lord,” Luke must approach him diplomatically) and that the Jedi do not have…

curiositycounts:

The 11 Best History Books of 2011 – what African drum languages have to do with women’s emancipation, radioactivity, and the future of the web

So brooding…

curiositycounts:

The 11 Best History Books of 2011 – what African drum languages have to do with women’s emancipation, radioactivity, and the future of the web

So brooding…

UK to make publicly funded research free to read

oldowan:

All scientific research funded by British taxpayers will be made available online free of charge, according to a government report published earlier this week. And it doesn’t stop there – the government intends the website, to be named Gateway to Research, to eventually incorporate research funded by other bodies.

Dammit US get your shit together.