23 year old, Systems theory junkie, INTP, and Transhumanist.

 

cool-critters:

Scorpionfly (Panorpa communis)

Panorpa communis, the common scorpionfly, is a species of scorpionfly native to Western Europe.

The common scorpionfly has a black and yellow body, with a reddish head and tail. The male has a pair of claspers at the end of its tail (for holding the female during mating), giving it a scorpion-like appearance, although it is not a stinger.

Although fully winged, the adults rarely fly very far and spend much of their time crawling on vegetation in damp, shaded places near water and along hedgerows.

heythereuniverse:

The Great Dying: Explosive Microbial Growth Caused Earth’s Greatest Extinction Event | The Daily Galaxy

The physical environment can produce sudden shocks to the life of our planet through impacting space rocks, erupting volcanoes and other events. But sometimes life itself turns the tables and strikes a swift blow back to the environment. MIT researchers have identified a different culprit — one coming from biology rather than geology. They argue that the carbon disruption and, consequently, the end-Permian extinction were set off by a particular microorganism that evolved a new way to digest organic material into methane.

The end-Permian (or PT) extinction event occurred 252 million years ago. It is often called the Great Dying because around 90 percent of marine species disappeared in one fell swoop. Similar numbers died on land as well, producing a stark contrast between Permian rock layers beneath (or before) the extinction and the Triassic layers above. Extinctions are common throughout time, but for this one, the fossil record truly skipped a beat.

"The end-Permian is the greatest extinction event that we know of," said Daniel Rothman, a geophysicist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. “The changes in the fossil record were obvious even to 19th Century geologists.”

[Link to the original paper]

[Read more]

[Photo 1 Credit[Photo 2 Credit]

phoebethatcher:

Mushroom Primer, 2013, pen & ink. 

A 12-page zine/booklet, featuring a big diagram on the center spread. Print-your-own*, or, if you know me in real life, I’ll print you one on request ($2 apiece). 

*Make sure to trick your printer into not cutting off the borders (like in the second picture down). 

wildcat2030:

Biohackers Are Growing Real Cheese In A Lab, No Cow Needed -Real vegan cheese. It’s not an oxymoron, it’s a miracle of synthetic biology. / If you’re a vegan, cheese options are limited. There are high-quality vegan cheeses out there, but they just don’t taste the same, and they’re mostly soft— it’s difficult to make any sort of hard vegan cheese, like gouda or cheddar. A team of Bay Area biohackers is trying to create a new option: real vegan cheese. That is, cheese derived from baker’s yeast that has been modified to produce real milk proteins. It’s the same as cow cheese, but made without the cow. Think of it as the cheese equivalent of lab-grown meat. The journey towards vegan cheese began a few years ago, when synthetic biologist Marc Juul started thinking about the genetic engineering possibilities. Now, Juul and a group of people from two Bay Area biohacker spaces, Counter Culture Labs and BioCurious, are trying to create a finished product in time for the International Genetically Engineered Machine competition—a global synthetic biology competition—in October. So far, they’ve raised over $16,000 on Indiegogo to do it. (via Biohackers Are Growing Real Cheese In A Lab, No Cow Needed | Co.Exist | ideas impact)

wildcat2030:

Biohackers Are Growing Real Cheese In A Lab, No Cow Needed
-
Real vegan cheese. It’s not an oxymoron, it’s a miracle of synthetic biology.
/
If you’re a vegan, cheese options are limited. There are high-quality vegan cheeses out there, but they just don’t taste the same, and they’re mostly soft— it’s difficult to make any sort of hard vegan cheese, like gouda or cheddar. A team of Bay Area biohackers is trying to create a new option: real vegan cheese. That is, cheese derived from baker’s yeast that has been modified to produce real milk proteins. It’s the same as cow cheese, but made without the cow. Think of it as the cheese equivalent of lab-grown meat. The journey towards vegan cheese began a few years ago, when synthetic biologist Marc Juul started thinking about the genetic engineering possibilities. Now, Juul and a group of people from two Bay Area biohacker spaces, Counter Culture Labs and BioCurious, are trying to create a finished product in time for the International Genetically Engineered Machine competition—a global synthetic biology competition—in October. So far, they’ve raised over $16,000 on Indiegogo to do it. (via Biohackers Are Growing Real Cheese In A Lab, No Cow Needed | Co.Exist | ideas impact)

The Alnwick Poison Garden is pretty much what you’d think it is: a garden full of plants that can kill you (among many other things). Some of the plants are so dangerous that they have to be kept behind bars. [x]

(Source: bregma)